Five Reasons I Teach Cursive

Beyond giving students a competitive edge, here are some other impossible-to-ignore reasons.

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Two days ago, my post focused on this reason to teach cursive: to make sure that kids in public school are competitive with kids in private schools and around the world, where cursive writing is taught and practiced regularly.

I discuss this very practical reason with my students and it seems to really sink in… that learning cursive isn’t just something I think they should do, or their parents feel nostalgic about, but that it’s something that their peers are learning, so why shouldn’t they have the same opportunity?

Today, I’ve gathered some other more commonly cited reasons to teach cursive. These reasons, while solid, are often-discussed in academic circles. It’s easy to find several articles online that tout and support these reasons. I’ve included a few of these well-known reasons below to build my case for teaching and practicing cursive writing in public schools. Even though cursive writing is no longer in the standards for Missouri, I believe it should still be part of our school day.

1. Cursive writing activates the brain. “Brain scans reveal neural circuitry lighting up when young children first print letters and then read them. The same effect is not apparent when the letters are typed or traced,” writes Tom Berger, executive editor at Edutopia.org. While addressing handwriting in general, this idea can transfer to cursive writing specifically. Berger writes that cursive, and other forms of handwriting, commands specific patterns in the way our brains work.

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Photo by Lesly Juarez on Unsplash

In addition, students take better notes when they write by hand. The benefits of manual note-taking are compounded when students use cursive, according to Cursive Logic, a provider of cursive curriculum, including some cool freebies you can download. Students who take notes by hand actually digest the content and reframe it in their own words—a process that increases both understanding and recall.

Here’s one last note from Campaign for Cursive, a volunteer organization that advocates cursive: “(Cursive writing) unlocks potential for abstract thinking, allows the human brain to compartmentalize, and expands memory capacity.” Obviously, cursive has a definite connection to critical thinking, which was my school district’s central focus last year.

2. I’ve noticed that kids definitely struggle when they work with their hands these days. If cutting with scissors is a challenge for some, imagine how they may feel when I ask them to write in cursive!  Practicing cursive writing improves hand-eye coordination, fine motor skills, and memory functions, writes Berger.  It’s more than just about writing a fancy script; writing in cursive will hone their fine motor skills outside the classroom.

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Photo: Pixabay

3. In my own opinion, cursive writing is a connection to our past. If kids expose themselves to cursive writing, they’ll be able to read letters and documents written long ago. True, cursive may not be a requirement for living in the 21st century, but it can still have important functions.  Read this post about how I have connected with my own ancestors through cursive correspondence.

4. I’ve heard numerous students comment that they enjoy seeing their cursive writing improve over the school year. It’s nice to hear them notice their own progress. When students see their cursive writing improve, they experience a pride of workmanship. Like with any skill, practice makes perfect.

5. As kids grow into young adults, cursive can help. Writing in cursive is considered an important rite of passage by many students. It’s a signal that one is maturing and growing in intellect. Removing cursive writing from the standards unfairly denies this gift to students. Why not allow kids this opportunity?


Thanks for reading! How do you feel about cursive writing? Do your students practice it? Is it required?  Feel free to leave a comment to share your experience and follow my blog to stay in touch. 

Gold stars for everyone!

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Time to reflect on the first year of my 7th-grade PBL project

Year one is down! During the 2017-18 academic school year, my seventh-grade language arts classes started a project in partnership with the White River Valley Historical Society, a local organization in Forsyth, Mo., that preserves, promotes, and protects the cultural heritage of southern Missouri and northern Arkansas. Read other posts about this project here.

The project was to rejuvenate a children’s newsletter called Whippersnappers that the society had published previously for a few years, but later abandoned when its primary contributor, a volunteer student, grew older. Over the course of a few conversations last summer with the society’s director, it was decided that my seventh-grade students could contribute the content. Here’s the front page of our second issue:

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Somehow I got home for summer without the latest issue! I’ll add it to this post later.

To produce each issue, my classes thought up story ideas for the newsletter, wrote their stories, and shared in the writing process as they researched and revised their work for publication by the WRVHS. In October, our first issue was distributed. Just before Christmas break, our December/January issue was released. In March, the February/March issue came out, and the final issue of the year was released the day before school let out for the summer.

It was a whirlwind year, full of experimentation and unpredictability. I’ve listed below, in no particular order, some positives from the experience, but will probably think of more as the summer progresses. As I think of other positives, I’ll edit them into this post, so follow this blog to be aware of updates.

  1. Students were able to choose their own story topics; they had agency over the content. For the first couple of issues, we brainstormed ideas on the whiteboard. More than enough ideas were gained from these brainstorms that those first two brainstorming sessions created a topic list from which students could choose for the remaining two issues.
  2. Students had to consider their audience. The readers of the Whippersnappers newsletter are kids ages five to fourteen, which is quite a span. Writers had to decide exactly who, within that age range, their particular story appealed to, and keep those readers in mind with regard to word choice.
  3. Students were required to consider the criteria of the publisher. Stories had to contain a local or regional history angle. If that focus was missing from a story, students needed to figure out how to include them before their stories could be submitted to the publisher.
  4. It was satisfying for the students to see their name in print. (Due to privacy, students’ first names and last initial were used for their bylines.) In addition, seeing where in the issue their article was placed was important to them. They liked being on page one; however, when their story was placed last in the issue, we discussed the reasons publishers might have for doing this, such as space limitations.
  5. Students knew they had an authentic audience that would be reading their work; I was not the final audience. They knew that people in the community would be receiving these in their mail and that made their work more accountable.
  6. Field trips were fun! We took two, one to the WRVHS main office in Forsyth, Mo. and their newer museum in downtown Branson. This allowed them to see up close the work of the WRVHS and to hold some historical artifacts, as well as see the society’s archives and files.
  7. They learned by trial-and-error that sentence variety takes on new meaning with a publication. After our second issue was published, we held a “wrap-up” discussion and noticed that about half started with the question, “Did you know that…?” Seeing the over-reliance on this common introductory technique showed them the need to work harder at varying their leads. It also showed the importance of previewing the issue as a whole.

I’m glad there are only a few negatives to reflect upon. I would like to tackle these for the next 2018-19 school year:

  1. Research was limited. Students used an online database of the society’s quarterly magazine almost exclusively. This database, however, only had searchable issues through 1997, due to a grant partnership with a local library system. Students would reference information found in these magazines with standard attribution and speaker tags. The benefits of this was that students could safely and easily research their topic. However, using this one form of research was limiting. It would have been great to vary our research with interviews or in-person contact with researchers at the WRVHS, for example. Next year, I would like to address this issue. Another hurdle is that my students do not have email addresses, so that limits how they can contact sources. The WRVHS director suggested a private Facebook group where the students could post questions to anonymous research volunteers at the WRVHS. This might be an alternative.
  2. Classroom management was challenging. During those first few days of researching and writing, as students were grappling with their topics and how to begin, classroom management was difficult. Some students could work independently, which was a great help. Most students needed my help from time to time and if I was busy working with another student, they would just stop working and wait on me. Eventually, they would begin to distract others. And then a few students need constant help and/or redirection. It’s was very hard to find the balance needed to make progress. There were a few days when I thought, “Why did I ever think this would work?” Those were the days I wanted to break out our textbooks and do a simple read-and-response assignment.
  3. I need more defined deadlines. Kids need to see results. Quickly. Stories for our first issue were sent out and about a week later, the issue was published and delivered. The other issues did not follow such a tight schedule, and I wished they had. When kids don’t know when the issue will print, they lose interest and excitement ebbs. So for next year, I’d like to set up a schedule to see if we can have solid dates for 1) delivering the stories to the publisher’s offices, and 2) receiving published newsletters back at school. If the students know that on Friday, Sept. 2, for example, we are sending out finished stories with no exceptions for last-minute edits or revisions, perhaps we will later see more predictable publishing dates.

All in all, I think this first year was a success and I want to try it again next year. The students seemed to value the experience and see importance in it.

What curriculum did I have to alter or remove in order to fit Whippersnappers into my year-long plans? I moved a novel unit to spring and just planned more tightly so everything could get accomplished. Seventh-graders still entered all the contests they normally do and they still completed their Writers Workshop project list. They became accustomed to having several projects in-process simultaneously. After all, I told them, that’s how real writers work.


Thank you for reading! Feel free to comment away to share your own PBL ideas for your ELA middle schoolers! One more thing: I am totally open to suggestions for how to address any of my “negatives” above. If you’ve done anything like this before, please share your secrets for classroom management, student research, etc. Let’s learn from each other!

It Bothers Me that Sept. 11 is Becoming “Historical” and in the Distant Past

I know the timing isn’t right on this post since 9/11 was last week, but I thought I would go ahead and reblog it here for future reference. I originally wrote it for my personal blog, http://www.marilynyung.wordpress.com

Marilyn Yung

This is a drawing my daughter made on Sept. 11, 2001, when she was six.

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My daughter understood the devastation and the loss of that day. As for myself, I have noticed a diminishing sadness when I contemplate September 11. It seems the shock has softened some for me, to be honest. I don’t notice the empty New York City skyline like I used to. When I watch an old movie with the Twin Towers in the skyline, I notice their absence, but it doesn’t catch my breath like it used to, and it bothers me that the event is becoming “historical”… in the distant past.

FullSizeRender (18) From a Statue of Liberty ferry | August 1997

Of course, for those who lost loved ones on that day, it’s a different story. 2001 may still be as near to them as the last intersection they drove through. I understand that for many…

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