Where have all the “thank you” notes gone?

Here’s what happened the first time I taught the “thank you” note

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Okay, where are the thank you notes? Who said they were no longer necessary? Someone must have, because I often don’t receive one anymore. And it’s not as if I’m expecting one, but I would like to at least know that the gift I shipped was received. Unfortunately, sometimes I never find that out.

So, to counter this trend, last year I added thank you notes to our project list for writer’s workshop.

Here’s the background on how I have done writer’s workshop in my class for the past two years:

I have only done this structured form of writer’s workshop during the first and second quarters of the school year. I gave students a list of 8-10 projects from which they could choose to work on during dedicated workshop time. They were required to choose six projects from this list and complete the projects in any order they chose. There was a writing process to follow for each project. The process included:

  • writing a first draft
  • collaborating through peer response to the first draft
  • revising, editing, and then generating a second draft
  • receiving my feedback on their second draft
  • making final revisions and edits, and then generating a final draft.

At the end of the workshop period, usually the end of the quarter, students turned in all projects andaccompanying paperwork (prewriting, previous drafts, etc.) inside a two-pocket folder. Writing projects included poetry, how-to and/or listicle blog posts, academic essays, contest essays, arguments, short stories, and thank you notes. 

At the beginning of the school year, I bought a few boxes of thank you notes students could use for their notes. They were to write a short (one- to two-paragraphs) note to someone they knew, thanking them for a gift, their friendship, or their help. I asked them to draft out what they planned to write on a sheet of notebook paper, and for this project only, submit that to me as their first draft.

Unfortunately, the thank you note project didn’t go as well as I wanted. Here’s why:

  • Kids tended to rush through this project because they knew it was one they could complete more quickly than the others.
  • Nearly all of my kids didn’t have any idea where to put “Dear Mom,” or “Yours truly,” on the card. I should have spent an entire class period practicing filling out a note card. See the photo below as an example of how kids simply didn’t know how to fill out a note card.

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  • Some of the writing was very personal. Some were so personal, in fact, that I didn’t feel comfortable reading them. Once this happened a few times, I simply asked students to show me their drafts on notebook paper. Then, due to the personal nature of some of the writing, I would skim the notes for mechanical errors instead of reading them carefully for content. Then I would initial their drafts and they could then write their note on a note card. Many of the notes probably contained unclear thinking and I hope they didn’t cause confusion for the readers. My approach seemed like a very lame way to handle the project; however, I just didn’t feel comfortable critiquing such personal messages.

So for the school year that starts in August, I’m undecided about how to teach students to write a thank you note. I think it’s a valuable skill, but I clearly need to take a different approach to it based on my experiences last year. Here are a few things that may help:

  • Perhaps dedicating an entire class period to the basic format or layout of a note card would be sufficient.
  • Also, maybe it would help if, instead of having students write their drafts on notebook paper, I provided a template cut to size so they could practice writing it on the space provided. Transferring their note from a full sheet of paper to the dimensions of a standard-size note card proved difficult for them last year. In fact, from my own experience, I know that figuring out where the words will be placed and where I’ll put any hyphens and such helps me create a more attractive, well-written note. It just makes the note look more planned out, more intentional.
  • Encouraging students to slow down with this project. Just because it’s only a paragraph of writing doesn’t mean it should be done carelessly.
  • For next year, I may also require them to write their thank you notes in cursive. They need to know that many readers will keep their notes as keepsakes and will want to read them again. Writing in cursive will make their note more formal and meaningful.

I’m interested in your ideas. Do you teach traditional letter writing or thank you notes? Do you think this is an important skill or one that may as well be done on a laptop? Leave a comment and let me know!


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Five Reasons I Teach Cursive

Beyond giving students a competitive edge, here are some other impossible-to-ignore reasons.

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Two days ago, my post focused on this reason to teach cursive: to make sure that kids in public school are competitive with kids in private schools and around the world, where cursive writing is taught and practiced regularly.

I discuss this very practical reason with my students and it seems to really sink in… that learning cursive isn’t just something I think they should do, or their parents feel nostalgic about, but that it’s something that their peers are learning, so why shouldn’t they have the same opportunity?

Today, I’ve gathered some other more commonly cited reasons to teach cursive. These reasons, while solid, are often-discussed in academic circles. It’s easy to find several articles online that tout and support these reasons. I’ve included a few of these well-known reasons below to build my case for teaching and practicing cursive writing in public schools. Even though cursive writing is no longer in the standards for Missouri, I believe it should still be part of our school day.

1. Cursive writing activates the brain. “Brain scans reveal neural circuitry lighting up when young children first print letters and then read them. The same effect is not apparent when the letters are typed or traced,” writes Tom Berger, executive editor at Edutopia.org. While addressing handwriting in general, this idea can transfer to cursive writing specifically. Berger writes that cursive, and other forms of handwriting, commands specific patterns in the way our brains work.

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Photo by Lesly Juarez on Unsplash

In addition, students take better notes when they write by hand. The benefits of manual note-taking are compounded when students use cursive, according to Cursive Logic, a provider of cursive curriculum, including some cool freebies you can download. Students who take notes by hand actually digest the content and reframe it in their own words—a process that increases both understanding and recall.

Here’s one last note from Campaign for Cursive, a volunteer organization that advocates cursive: “(Cursive writing) unlocks potential for abstract thinking, allows the human brain to compartmentalize, and expands memory capacity.” Obviously, cursive has a definite connection to critical thinking, which was my school district’s central focus last year.

2. I’ve noticed that kids definitely struggle when they work with their hands these days. If cutting with scissors is a challenge for some, imagine how they may feel when I ask them to write in cursive!  Practicing cursive writing improves hand-eye coordination, fine motor skills, and memory functions, writes Berger.  It’s more than just about writing a fancy script; writing in cursive will hone their fine motor skills outside the classroom.

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Photo: Pixabay

3. In my own opinion, cursive writing is a connection to our past. If kids expose themselves to cursive writing, they’ll be able to read letters and documents written long ago. True, cursive may not be a requirement for living in the 21st century, but it can still have important functions.  Read this post about how I have connected with my own ancestors through cursive correspondence.

4. I’ve heard numerous students comment that they enjoy seeing their cursive writing improve over the school year. It’s nice to hear them notice their own progress. When students see their cursive writing improve, they experience a pride of workmanship. Like with any skill, practice makes perfect.

5. As kids grow into young adults, cursive can help. Writing in cursive is considered an important rite of passage by many students. It’s a signal that one is maturing and growing in intellect. Removing cursive writing from the standards unfairly denies this gift to students. Why not allow kids this opportunity?


Thanks for reading! How do you feel about cursive writing? Do your students practice it? Is it required?  Feel free to leave a comment to share your experience and follow my blog to stay in touch.