My “Article of the Week” rubric for middle and high school

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Plus rubrics you can tweak  to fit your classroom

Last February, I wrote this post about what I consider to be my most effective writing assignment: Kelly Gallagher’s Article of the Week (AOW).

I still use this assignment on a weekly basis, but I’ve added narrative writing to the mix by assigning what I call Essays of the Week (EOWs) every other week. These narrative assignments use prompts provided by The New York Times Learning Network. I select a grouping of prompts from the list and let students choose one to respond to.

Here are some photos of the rubric portions of my AOWs and EOWs.  And click here for a link to a Google Doc that contains all the rubrics below.

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This is the rubric I made for the first AOW of the school year.
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This AOW rubric contains less explicit instructions for citing of the article. I use this rubric on AOWs so students have a little more leeway with how they set up, cite, and interpret their quotations from the article. Some students work best with this format; some need more structure. 
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This EOW rubric specifically asks students to begin their essays with dialogue. It also asks students to ground their dialogue with narration. On this same day, we also discussed dialogue punctuation and how to narrate dialogue with detail and elaboration about the characters who are speaking.
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This EOW rubric specifically asks students to use  a semicolon in their writing. On the day this was assigned, we also watched this video by Shmoop about how to use semicolons. 
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This EOW rubric specifically asks students to use an em dash in their writing. On the day this was assigned, we also watched this video by  Shmoop about how to use an em dash.

I usually assign a new AOW or EOW on the first day of the week with a hard copy due one week later. AOWs usually take a little more time to go over. For example, after a bell-ringer activity and a mini-lesson that addresses a specific skill required in the rubric (such as using semicolons), these take the better part of the class period when we complete these steps:

  • introducing the assignment
  • going over the rubric and its specific requirements
  • discussing the writing prompt
  • reading the article aloud
  • watching any related video on the news story

EOWs don’t take as much class time, since there’s no article to read. We might go through each prompt choice, however, and do some discussion to help students come up with writing ideas.

Let me know how these rubrics work for you.

My adaptation of Kelly Gallagher’s AOW is a mainstay in my teaching. The AOWs build nonfiction reading skills, improve writing stamina, and increase students’ prior knowledge of the world around them. My EOW simply adds variety to our routine while giving them opportunities to write narratives.


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Thanks for reading again this week! I appreciate any and all comments. In fact, this post was created in response to a comment posted just last week about this article.

Published by marilynyung

Writes | Teaches | Not sure where one ends and the other begins.

2 thoughts on “My “Article of the Week” rubric for middle and high school

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