Explore Frederick Douglass with graphic essays

In light of the current and rightful nationwide protests, I’ve updated and reblogged this post. I have also added a new Frederick Douglass category to my blog so posts that feature Douglass, who I believe to be our country’s most unsung hero, are easier to find. Next week, I plan to share with you my unit of instruction on the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave.

ELA Brave and True by Marilyn Yung

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A fresh way to reflect on Douglass’ experience, themes and symbolism

During spring 2019, I assigned  graphic essays to my eighth-graders after they finished reading Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave.  This incredible book, which provides Douglass’ first-hand account of the horrors and traumas of American slavery, provides a reading experience that is both sobering and inspiring. (Next week, I’ll be posting my entire unit of instruction on the book and I’ll definitely be interested in your thoughts. I’ve worked on it over six or seven years and while I believe it’s effective, I also feel it’s a little too “work-sheety.” Your ideas are more than welcome.)

In short, Douglass’ narrative is a lot to take in.

For my students, I felt graphic essays would:

  1. offer a break from traditional essay writing;
  2. help students discuss theme with evidence and their own commentary;
  3. allow students to…

View original post 891 more words

Published by marilynyung

Writes | Teaches | Not sure where one ends and the other begins.

3 thoughts on “Explore Frederick Douglass with graphic essays

    1. Yes. My own kids never learned or read about Douglass in school either. (They went to a different district than the one I taught in.) He’s awesome. Thanks for reading and for commenting!

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